Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice may have released a bit too late into Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order’s development to inspire much in it, but Respawn says there are core similarities between them.



Although the first thing that’s likely to jump to your mind is difficulty, Respawn is referring specifically to the action combat in Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order.


This is an observation I shared when the developer released the full E3 demo to the public, and it’s one also brought up by others after playing the game at the show behind-closed-doors.


Lead combat designer Jason de Heras, explained in the September issue of Edge (via WCCFTech) why that is.


According to Heras, both games have skilful action combat that do not rely on a stamina bar to maintain balance. Sekiro is unique in this among FromSoftware’s Soulsbourne games, and seeing it work well in the game solidified Respawn’s intent with Fallen Order.



“I thought it was pretty badass, and a little comforting to know that you could make this type of game without a stamina bar,” Heras revealed.


“They let you attack, they let you roll, they do all this for free – and then the AI will tell you if you’re doing the correct thing. It just confirmed to us that you don’t have to limit everything the player does; let them have a little more agency, and then let the AI give them a slap on the wrist or a punch in the face.


“It was a positive thing for us to know there was a game that was similar to ours. Very similar.”


Just like in Sekiro, Fallen Order, too, has its own parry system which rewards good timing. The extent to which these systems will be taken, however, remains to be seen. Fallen Order likely has to be a lot more accessible than Sekiro, so we might only see the best version of these systems on higher difficulties.


We’ll have to wait until the game’s November 15 release date to find out how far Respawn is willing to take it.


The post Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order dev explains why it’s “very similar” to Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice appeared first on VG247.




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